Wall prep for latex paint-How to Paint a Room | Steps to Painting a Room | This Old House

Color changes everything. Or lack of color, if that's your thing. Point is, everyone knows you can give your drab, washed-out walls a burst of brilliant depth or wash away your decorating sins with virgin white just by picking up a paint can and having at them. That's the power of a coat of paint: It rearranges your reality. That's where we come in.

Wall prep for latex paint

Wall prep for latex paint

Well, you want to know what kind of paint you have so you can either put the same thing on top of it, or so you use a primer that will let you switch to a different type of Feet masterbation. Wash the walls with a sponge, using warm water and dish soap. Latex paints are preferred for general wall painting because they can be cleaned up with water and are therefore much easier to work with, but they really don't like sticking to oil paints at least not without some help from specialty primers. A quick fix is to prime the torn areas with a spray can of the shellac-based primer BIN. This is used to provide data on traffic to our website, all personally identifyable data is anonymized. Things you probably have to do: Fill in any cracks or small holes with paintable caulking - Once you have the main stuff done, go back around and use caulking to fill in any remaining cracks of small holes that you may have missed. Practice first - Wall prep for latex paint trick Wall prep for latex paint to get only a little bit of paint on the roller, then roll it out a few times in the tray. Question: Do Wall prep for latex paint typically paint over drywall anchors?

Wool double breasted swing coat. Preparing Walls Paint

Once you know how to paint brickyou can make the brick blend into the surroundings or stand out in a whole new Wall prep for latex paint. Academic masturbation series is designed for new commercial construction, new residential projects, facility and interior apartment property maintenance, and other Wall prep for latex paint jobs where high-hide and low odor performance is desired. Then sand horizontally along the baseboard and Mother ass fucked. Do we need to put primer over the existing paint? Each painter has slightly different methods and preferences, but the pros all know the trade secrets. See the original question. You have to start with a perfectly smooth surface to end up with perfectly painted walls or woodwork. Don't bother taping windows when painting sashes—it takes a long time and paint usually ends up on the glass anyway. You'll be able to wash a grubby fingerprint off the wall without taking the paint with it. Manufacturer's directions tell you how much extender to add per gallon of paint. Rubber gloves and eye protection are required.

Painting your walls is one of the easiest and least expensive ways to make a huge impact on your space.

  • Select a Benjamin Moore color to see how paint truly transforms a room.
  • Designed for professional contractor performance, Wall Pro has ultra-low VOC with minimal application odor and the high-build formula delivers superior hide and uniform leveling properties with great touch-up characteristics.
  • Each painter has slightly different methods and preferences, but the pros all know the trade secrets.
  • Once you know how to paint brick , you can make the brick blend into the surroundings or stand out in a whole new way.

Each painter has slightly different methods and preferences, but the pros all know the trade secrets. You have to start with a perfectly smooth surface to end up with perfectly painted walls or woodwork. Sanding levels outs spackle or joint-compound patches and flattens ridges around nail holes.

Sanding also removes burrs and rough spots in your trim. Sand the walls from the baseboard to the ceiling with fine-grit sanding paper on a sanding pole. Then sand horizontally along the baseboard and ceiling. Don't put a lot of pressure on the sanding pole or the head can flip over and damage the wall.

Sand woodwork with a sanding sponge to get into crevices. Don't cheap out on paint and brushes. Cheap brushes are false economy. Buy a Wooster or something with some heft. And the bristles fall out. It's versatile and you can wash and reuse it until the bristles wear down to a nub. Because it will go on easy and offer the best coverage.

It'll last a long time. You'll be able to wash a grubby fingerprint off the wall without taking the paint with it. And your whole job will just go quicker and easier. If you can't move furniture out of a room, move all of it to the center of the room and cover and wrap it with plastic sheets that are taped at the bottom. This will not only protect your furniture from paint drips and splatters, but also all of the dust from sanding. Before the pros paint walls, they fill holes and patch cracks with joint compound.

But if you paint directly over it, the compound will suck the moisture out of the paint, giving it a flat, dull look a problem called "flashing".

Those spots will look noticeably different than the rest of the wall. To avoid that, pros prime the walls before painting. Instead of using white primer, pros usually have it tinted gray or a color that's similar to the finish paint.

To avoid the pain-in-the-neck chore of scraping off the paint, do a thorough job of adhering the tape before you start. Use the blue painter's tape instead of masking tape. Masking tape can leave behind a sticky residue that's hard to clean off. Plus, paint can cause the tape to buckle or get wavy, which lets paint run underneath it.

Painter's tape can be left on for days some up to two weeks and still peel off cleanly. And it stops paint bleed without buckling. The secret to a finish that's free of lap and brush marks is mixing a paint extender also called a paint conditioner , such as Floetrol , into the paint. This does two things. First, it slows down the paint drying time, giving you a longer window to overlap just-painted areas without getting ugly lap marks that happen when you paint over dried paint and darken the color.

Second, paint extender levels out the paint so brushstrokes are virtually eliminated or at least much less obvious. Pros use extenders when painting drywall, woodwork, cabinets, and doors. Manufacturer's directions tell you how much extender to add per gallon of paint. Pros have a simple solution. They run a screwdriver along the perimeter of the ceiling to scrape off the texture. And you'll never even notice the missing texture. Pros don't use bedsheets as drop cloths, and neither should you.

Thin sheets won't stop splatters and spills from seeping through to your flooring. And while plastic can contain spills, the paint stays wet for a long time. That wet paint can and usually does find the bottom of your shoes and get tracked through the house.

Use what the pros use—canvas drop cloths. They're not slippery and they absorb splatters but still wipe up large spills or they can bleed through. It might seem easy to do all the corners and trim in a room, then go back to roll the walls, but don't.

Pros get a seamless look by cutting in one wall, then immediately rolling it before starting the next. This allows the brushed and the rolled paint to blend together better. Cover your paint bucket, tray, or container with a damp towel when switching between brushing and rolling to keep your paint and tools from drying out when not in use. Don't bother taping windows when painting sashes—it takes a long time and paint usually ends up on the glass anyway.

Go ahead and let paint get on the glass. Once it's dry, simply scrape it off with a razor blade. The paint peels off in seconds. The "same" color of paint can vary between cans. To ensure color consistency from start to finish, pros mix their cans of paint in a five-gallon bucket a process called "boxing".

Some pros then paint directly out of the bucket. This eliminates the need to pour paint into a roller tray, though the heavy bucket is harder to move. That's because, unless you're uncommonly motivated, you're not going to have freshly shaken paint for the duration of your project. And you can't bring settled paint back to life with a stir stick alone. No, you need to pour the paint back and forth between two buckets until you've scraped and mixed the solids at the bottom. That's the best, and really only, way to ensure your paint is mixed.

And if you have paint in several different cans, you want to mix those, too, to make sure everything is uniform. See "boxing. Whether you buy cheap or expensive roller covers, washing them before their first use gets rid of the fuzz that inevitably comes off once you start painting.

Wash them with water and a little bit of liquid soap, and run your hands up and down the covers to pull off any loose fibers a practice called "preconditioning covers". You can start using the roller covers right away—you don't need to let them dry. This is a no-brainer. Instead of laboriously taping or cutting around your switch plates, grab your screwdriver and take them off.

Then you'll have perfect coverage around the plate without any mess. In painter lingo, a bad set is when you're in a physically bad position for whatever you're trying to do—maybe your ladder isn't quite long enough, or you're in a awkward spot with your brush. The good news is that many bad sets are avoidable. Just climb down and move the ladder.

Yeah, it's annoying. But not as annoying as falling into your paint bucket because you were hanging off your ladder like an America's Cup crew member on the port sponson. And sometimes bad sets can be resolved by moving an obstacle. Fridge giving you a tough angle at a wall? Move the fridge. Here's another painter term for you: holiday. That's when you miss a spot without realizing it. It's easy to do, especially with similar colors.

So get yourself a work light and check your work, either as you go or when you finish a section. Paint won't bond to greasy or filthy surfaces, like kitchen walls above a stove, mudrooms where kids kick off their muddy boots and scuff the walls, or the areas around light switches that get swatted at with dirty hands.

Be sure to read the label and follow directions—this stuff is potent. Rubber gloves and eye protection are required. Pros take a "load and go" approach to painting. When your brush is loaded with paint, it's easy to create runs by applying too much paint in corners or along trim. As the brush unloads, move over and slowly drag the brush along the trim or corner.

Let the bristles gently push the paint against the cut-in area where the walls meet. You may have to do this a couple of times to get complete coverage, but it'll avoid excess paint along woodwork and in corners. When you're ready to call it a day, you can soak your roller in paint and then wrap it in a plastic bag so it's airtight. If you're returning to the job the next day, that'll work fine.

If it's going to be a while, you can still put the bag over the roller, but then use it to pull the roller off without covering yourself in paint. Then use a new roller the next time see: Don't be cheap. As for your expensive brush, you can wash that out—presuming you're using latex paint, which is water-based.

Drag a hose to an out-of-the way spot and wash the brush while alternately rapping it against the bottom of your shoe to shake out the bristles. Do that until it's clean and it'll be ready to go the next time you steel your courage to tackle another room.

Type keyword s to search. Today's Top Stories. Scientists Are Shrinking Particle Accelerators.

You may have to do this a couple of times to get complete coverage, but it'll avoid excess paint along woodwork and in corners. Here's another painter term for you: holiday. Let the primer dry completely. It'll last a long time. Designed for professional contractor performance, Wall Pro has ultra-low VOC with minimal application odor and the high-build formula delivers superior hide and uniform leveling properties with great touch-up characteristics. Instead of using white primer, pros usually have it tinted gray or a color that's similar to the finish paint. They're not slippery and they absorb splatters but still wipe up large spills or they can bleed through.

Wall prep for latex paint

Wall prep for latex paint

Wall prep for latex paint

Wall prep for latex paint

Wall prep for latex paint. Wall Pro Prep HH (503409)

.

Painting your walls is one of the easiest and least expensive ways to make a huge impact on your space. Unfortunately, that impact can be positive "wow, the room looks so much bigger" or negative "why is there a big purple stain on the carpet in your bedroom? However, if you take your time and pay attention to what you're doing, painting is a fairly easy skill to pick up it just takes a little practice I'm hoping that this instructable will help anyone who's new to painting.

Whether you want to set yourself up with some good basic gear to tackle your fixer upper, or you just want to get your dorm room or apartment painted. Did you use this instructable in your classroom? Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson. First of all, you need to figure out what kind of paint you have on the walls. If you use a little denatured alcohol on the paint, it will tend to have a noticeable effect on latex paints and it won't really do anything to oil-based paints.

You often also tell by feel, latex paint will tend to have a slightly rubbery give to it, oil will be smooth. However, figuring this out by feel usually requires a fair bit of practice so if you have any doubts, go with the chemistry approach. Why is this so important? Well, you want to know what kind of paint you have so you can either put the same thing on top of it, or so you use a primer that will let you switch to a different type of paint.

Latex paints are preferred for general wall painting because they can be cleaned up with water and are therefore much easier to work with, but they really don't like sticking to oil paints at least not without some help from specialty primers. Once you know what you have on your walls, you can go to the store and talk to the folks there to find out what they recommend for your situation.

I usually go for "one coat" store brands. If you're painting something that you may want to repaint soon-ish e. That's a personal and financial preference though. However, if you can, you should try to buy yourself some good quality brushes, rollers, etc If you take good care of them they can last you many many years and they really do make a difference in painting. However, a perfectly reasonable alternative is to buy something very cheap and plan on throwing it away after one or two uses very cheap brushes tend to do things like starting to lose bristles as you paint which is a pain.

Also, depending on how much you plan to paint e. You probably don't want to tint it if you plan on using it with multiple colors, but I've haven't really seen a major need for it. Tinting can make things a little easier, but I personally like having a lot of primer on hand so I can really make sure I prep my walls as well as possible rather than worrying about running out of primer in a specific tint so one 5-gallon can of white primer was my choice for painting 5 rooms in my house in various colors and I still have a decent bit left.

However, it does have a tendency to get dirty easier than other alternatives. Satin - Is my preferred paint for areas that don't see a lot of moisture. Unlike flat paint, satin has a slight hence satiny sheen to it and it looks good without looking outright shiny like semi-gloss. This also means it tends to resist dirt and grime better than flat paint. Semi-Gloss - This is what you should use in your kitchens and baths. It's got a good bit of shine to it and it tends to handle moisture and humidity better than satin or flat so it's easier to keep clean you can wipe it down as needed.

Once you know what kind of paint you want and you've settled on a brand, you can go ahead and choose a color. Some people might say that you should pick your color before the brand, but in my experience and given the color selection for even the least expensive paints, you're better off keeping you budget in mind and then working within what you can afford. I'm not even going to try and suggest how you go about picking a specific color, but if you're very picky about shades and slight differences in colors, don't rely on a the small paint chips you find at the store.

Then put it in your room and see how it looks at various times of day and see how it looks against your furniture etc Make sure you really like it before you proceed. This step isn't absolutely crucial, but it's certainly one to consider before you jump in and start painting. Also keep in mind that the actual colors and their lightness or darkness can significantly impact your mood.

The last thing you want is to make a space unpleasant to be in by choosing a color that is not conducive to the room's activity e. If you have plenty of space along the perimeter by putting everything in the middle of the room and covering it with a tarp, that's fine, but for small rooms or those with a lot of stuff, clearing them out either partially or completely works best.

You really don't want to be tripping over things while you're dealing with paint. Paint isn't particularly hard to work with, but you would be amazed at how easily you can get it places you didn't intend to. Keeping that in mind, you should try to make plans so that the furrier and smaller members of your household are not going to get into mischief while you work. In general the newer the house the less critical this step is, but it's always good to give the area a thorough inspection before you start.

This is the point where you really want to poke and prod anything that looks even remotely odd and make sure it's in paintable condition. This was brought up earlier and while it is possible to do a good job painting with cheap brushes and roller covers, you can do a better job with good high-end ones but they aren't cheap. He was a professional painter for quite some time and he knows his brushes ;. To paraphrase what he told me I actually took notes so I could get this right and for my own future reference : If you're painting with oil based paint, you would want to use a "china bristle" brush these will mainly have black bristles.

The "heel" is the part that fits to the handle. A good paintbrush will have a well built heel and you can generally feel the difference between cheap brushes and premium ones.

All good brushes also have an empty space where the bristles are placed in the heel. This space is made by a wedge and you can see the space if you check between the bristles.

The spacing is where the paint reserve is going to go. Do your best to avoid brushes that have a solid heel in these the bristles are usually glued into the heel with no spacer.

Look for the same design features for a brush used for latex paint but the bristles should be polyester better or nylon. Handmade brushes, in general, are better and clearly say they are handmade to justify the premium cost.

For both oil and latex though you want wooden handles and you want to see that the heel and handle are joined with nails. When you're done using them they should be washed properly, combed , and wrapped for storage. When you're looking for roller covers, the best cover for any but very smooth surfaces is lambswool.

Hands down with no comparison, nothing else comes close, but you will have to pay for that quality and they may seem rather expensive compared to the other covers available.

Composite covers are a very distant second. You are lucky to get uses out of a cheap roller cover. If you need to paint smooth and ultra-smooth surfaces then you want to use a solid-fill foam roller cover.

It doesn't leave bubbles that last so you can get a finish that does not need to be brushed combed out to get rid of them. You usually find them in small sizes like 3" or 4". A The folding utility knife is a really neat invention. Get yourself one of these and some blades if you need to do any drywall work. It'll make a big difference and it's a lot nicer not to have to dis-assemble your knife to change blades and dull blades can cause problems and even be dangerous. B Some tools for hard to reach spots: A sanding block on a pole - You don't really NEED this, but if you have a lot of sanding to do, it can be a huge help and a major time saver.

The alternative is often having to move your ladder around to get to higher spots and it gets tedious. A paint roller on a pole - If you're concerned about weight, consider buying a cheap and light mop handle instead of a telescoping painter's pole. The thread is usually the same and the mop handle is a lot lighter. I've been using the gray one in the photo for several years now and for any standard height room say 9' and lower it reaches everywhere..

A floor scraper - If you're painting on a solid floor i. It really is that much better to work with and it seems to resist cracking better than paper tape does. Easy mixing, smooth applying. Low shrinkage, excellent bonding. E Ladders - If you should decide to buy a ladder, find one similar to this one. It has spaces for tools, screws, paint cans AND roller trays the long slits are meant to hook into the tray. This is a great use for the top step you're not supposed to be on i the first place ;.

F Here you have some of the standard issue tools you'll have to get familiar with. Oh, except that white one there, don't bother with it. Totally not worth it. It's not going to be hugely satisfying and it will not be anywhere near as much fun as actually seeing the paint go on the walls, but if you do this right, the painting process will be much less painful and you'll have a final product you can be proud of. If necessary: Protect floor with a drop-cloth, pretty self explanatory.

In some of my photos you see no drop cloth, that's a function of having wood floors that need refinishing. If you have a carpet you really want to preserve then make sure you really do a good job of protecting it with the drop cloth and if it's new construction and you have no floor, don't worry about it, you're set.

Deal with wallpaper - Notice that I didn't say remove wallpaper. Some folks may tell you to just take it all down, but in my experience that should be a function of house age and condition of the paper e. In several of the photos with the green and red walls you can see where I did have to pull off a lot of wallpaper, but I left some of it because it was adhered to the plaster better than the plaster was adhered to the lathe.

My rule of thumb is to pull down all the paper that feels like it's not really firmly stuck onto the walls. The second photo shows how I had to replace one of the moldings that was just torn apart by the previous owners. As much as possible you want to get rid of bumps and other things that may cause problems while you paint. Things you probably have to do: Fill in any cracks or small holes with paintable caulking - Once you have the main stuff done, go back around and use caulking to fill in any remaining cracks of small holes that you may have missed.

If your walls are in good shape, you might start from here and skip the previous 2 steps. Lightly sand the walls - You are not trying to sand your walls into perfect smoothness. In fact you're actually trying to make sure they're roughed up enough to make it easier for the primer to hold on.

You'll want to use heavy to medium grit sandpaper for this. Clean up all the dust and wash the walls - You can use a tack cloth for this, or just grab a sponge and bucket and go to work.

This is really not fun, but you'll appreciate doing this later.

Wall prep for latex paint

Wall prep for latex paint

Wall prep for latex paint